Thursday, 20 July 2000   
14:00-15:30
THEME SESSION CONCURRENT SESSIONS DESCRIPTION
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1 Technologies for Internet Infrastructure Internet QoS Provisioning: Differentiated Services and MPLS Bruce Davie       Paper Jun Ogawa Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. Japan ogawa@flab.fujitsu.co.jp Improved Internet traffic engineering and predictability is essential to deploying cost-effective virtual private networks, commercial applications, and life-support services. The technologies for improving quality of service have been defined and discussed; how are they doing, and what do we need to think about next?
          Yojiro Uo Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Hokuriku Japan yuo@nui.org
Minoru Koizumi Systems Development Lab., Hitachi, Ltd. Japan m-koizu@sdl.hitachi.co.jp
2 Internet Technology and Science for the 21st Century Making TCP Faster, Fair and Scalable         Paper Go Hasegawa Faculty of Economics, Osaka University Japan hasegawa@ics.es.osaka-u.ac.jp A number of proposals have been made to improve TCP in terms of performance and fair- ness. This session brings together improvements to past proposals, evaluation of past proposals under QoS-enabled environment, and potential issues in making transition to revised TCP.
          Kenji Kurata Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University. Japan k-kurata@ics.es.osaka-u.ac.jp
Hiroyuki Koga Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan koga@cse.kyutech.ac.jp
3 Mobile Internet and IP Network Appliances Enabling Small Network Environments Jun Murai Keio University / WIDE Project Japan junsec@wide.ad.jp Paper Masahiko Kimoto Tokyo Institute of Technology Japan kimoto@ohnolab.org The internet protocols can scale down to occu- py small networks in homes and offices. But new mechanisms are needed so the necessary bootstrapping can take place securely, dynamically and with little or no manual administration.
          James Kempf Sun Microsystems USA james.kempf@sun.com
Erik Guttman Sun Microsystems Germany erik.guttman@sun.com
4 Interactive, Multimedia, Innovative Contents (Live demonstrations) Digital Audio and Video Applications on Advanced Research and Education Networks Ted Hanss Internet2 USA ted@internet2.edu Panel Joel Mambretti International Center for Advanced Internet Research (iCAIR), Northwestern University, Metropolitan Research and Education Network (MREN) USA j-mambretti@nwu.edu Advanced research and Education networks, which serve usually as a test-bad for many applications, among others provide with the ability to build, as well as deploy multi-media based content with high fidelity. The content includes applications in teaching, learning, research, clinical needs, life music and dance performances, and intensive simulations. The high capacity of the links enables the use of the applications to foster global collaborations.
5 Bio-Medical Issues The Internet and People with Disabilities Michael R. Burks International Center For Disability Resources on the Internet and AT&T USA mburks952@att.net Panel Jason Leigh Electronic Visualization Laboratory, Univ. of Illinois at Chicago USA spiff@evl.uic.edu Individuals with disabilities face many barriers to full participation in day-to-day activities. But with the advent of the Internet, some of these people have found an area where their disability is irrelevant to their participation, whereas others must merely add it to the list of things they can't do. This panel explores some of the notable successes and the efforts being made to overcome the barriers to others for whom participation is currently difficult or impossible.
7 E-Commerce and E-Business Opportunities and Threats in the Global e-Commerce Marketplace Michael Nelson IBM USA mrn@us.ibm.com Paper William A. Foster University of Arizona USA wfoster@bpa.arizona.edu As global e-commerce is being developed around the world, nations discover how to make use of the huge opportunities offered by this really global fully transparent market. In their way to the new economy they learn how to adapt their structures and how to cope with the potential dangers to their local industry as well as new ways to develop their economies beyond the development line. This session will show how large emergent economies are dealing with theses issues.
          Vivien Liew-Yin Chiam International Development Research Centre, Regional Office for Southeast and East Asia Singapore vchiam@idrc.org.sg
Zuraida Boerhanoed-din Indonesian Satellite Corp.
(PT Indosat Tbk.)
Indonesia ib03@indosat.net.id
Lamia Chaffai Sghaier Tunisian Internet Agency(ATI) Tunisia lamia@ati.tn
8 Regulation, Policy and Governance Making Our Own Rules: Governance of Cyberspace         Paper Kenji Rikitake TDI RCAC Project Japan kenji@rcac.tdi.co.jp
kenji.rikitake@acm.org
In the early days of the Internet, the academics running the network resolved disputes in an informal, ad hoc manner. Today, as billion- dollar companies vie to gain advantage in the digital economy and public interest groups and governments strive to protect their citizens, there are increasing calls for government regulation of the Internet. Yet, many in the Internet community argue that self-regulation and technology, not government intervention, can address growing concerns about domain names, on-line privacy, and other Internet issues.
          Amy Friedlander Center for Information Strategyand Technology, Science Applications International Corporation USA amy.e.friedlander@saic.com
Jeffrey H. Matsuura Alliance Law Group, LLC USA jmatsuura@alliancelawgroup.com
Louis Coetzee CSIR, Mikomtek South Africa louis.coetzee@csir.co.za
 
Thursday, 20 July 2000   
16:00-17:30
THEME SESSION CONCURRENT SESSIONS DESCRIPTION
# title title chair chair
organization
chair
country
chair
e-mail
  speaker speaker
organization
speaker
country
speaker
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2 Internet Science and Technology for the 21st Century NGI Research Projects: What's New, What's Next and What Works?         Super Panel Douglas Van Houweling Internet2 USA dvh@internet2.edu Late-breaking news from Next-generation Internet projects will be presented. Panelists will address their current status, next step, and what has led them to success.
          Greg Wood Internet2 USA ghwood@internet2.edu
Peter Marshall CANARIE Inc. Canada marshall@canarie.ca
Jun Murai Keio University / WIDE Project Japan jun@wide.ad.jp
8 Regulation, Policy and Governance On the Fringes of the Internet         Super Panel         Some people believe the Internet is a haven for hackers, pornographers, hate groups, and perverts. It is true that the structure and culture of the Internet attracts and tolerates illegal behavior? What's really going on in the "red light districts" of the Internet? Is it true that porn sites are among the most profitable on the net?
8 Regulation, Policy and Governance The Internet is not for Everbody (Yet) - A Policy Debate         Super Panel         In the countries around the world, there is increasing concern about "information haves and have nots." Statistics show clearly that wealthy people are much more likely to be on-line. Since the unconnected have less access to information and economic opportunities, many have called for government action to help "connect the unconnected." Are market forces enough or is government action necessary to avoid increasing the disparity between rich and poor? If so, what should be done?
 
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